AUDRE LORDE TRANSFORMATION OF SILENCE INTO LANGUAGE AND ACTION PDF

Shazil The surgery was completed, and the growth was benign. Kary Li rated it it was amazing Jul 25, Sherly marked it as to-read May 23, For others, it is to share and spread also those words that are meaningful to us. To sit back, not be heard and allow yourself to sulk in your own oppression goes against the movement which black women have been advocating for. Calley rated it it was amazing Apr 13, Goldentheponyboy rated it it was amazing Mar 03, What are the tyrannies you swallow day by day and attempt lf make your own, until you will sicken and die of them, still in silence? Because in this way alone we can survive, by taking part in a process of life that is creative and solence, that is growth.

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But in the context of the entire essay — a beautiful essay on breast cancer, mortality, fear, race, visibility, and vulnerability — Lorde offers so much more than a highly quotable sentence on the responsibility or risk of silence or speech. An excerpt: "And, of course, I am afraid — you can hear it in my voice — because the transformation of silence into language and action is an act of self-revelation and that always seems fraught with danger. But most of all, I think, we fear the visibility without which we also cannot truly live.

Within this country where racial difference creates a constant, if unspoken, distortion of vision, black women have on one hand always been highly visible, and so, on the other hand, have been rendered invisible through the depersonalization of racism. For to survive in the mouth of this dragon we call america, we have had to learn this first and most vital lesson — that we were never meant to survive.

Not as human beings. And neither were most of you here today, black or not. And that visibility which makes you most vulnerable is also our greatest strength. Because the machine will try to grind us into dust anyway, whether or not we speak. We can sit in out corners mute forever while our sisters and ourselves are wasted, while our children are distorted and destroyed, while our earth is poisoned, we can sit in our safe corners as mute as bottles, and still we will be no less afraid.

I first heard about the shooting death of year-old Michael Brown, a week ago today, on Twitter. I heard about the death from a fellow writer, Sarah Kendzior, who lives in St. I watched as the story unfolded on social media via the various social justice activists I follow broadly speaking, I follow three groups on Twitter: educators, journalists, and social justice activists ; journalists responded much more slowly, eventually picking up the story as a militarized police force tear-gassed an angry and grieving community.

And then there were those who were silent. Another and another and another. In the transformation of silence into language and action, it is vitally necessary to teach by living and speaking those truths which we believe and know beyond understanding. Because in this way alone we can survive, by taking part in a process of life that is creative and continuing, that is growth.

And it is never without fear; of visibility, of the harsh light of scrutiny and perhaps of judgment, of pain, of death. But we have lived through all of those already, in silence, except death. And I remind myself all the time now, that if I was to have been born mute or had maintained an oath of silence my whole life long for safety, I would still have suffered, and I would still die.

It is very good for establishing perspective. When are we silent? What does our silence mean? When is our silence about our fears, our vulnerabilities? When is our silence bound up in our privilege of not having to speak? When is our silence complicitous? There is no single answer here, of course. But, as Lorde reminds us, our silence will not protect us. I worry a lot about the silence on issues of race and gender among educators, particularly those in ed-tech. Yet the patterns of silence are there.

I want us to think: how might education technology — its development, its implementation — be shaped by these patterns? So yes, I often feel that I have to be even more vocal because silence is — has been — so defeaning. It is — has been — the norm, a reflection of the privilege white privilege, class privilege, male privilege of much of the ed-tech community.

So yes, I am louder. And I worry about the safety of my allies. I worry about the safety of students of color. I worry about the safety of communities of color. Physical safety. Mental well-being. Our future. I worry who our silence, what our silence might protect. What is our responsibility to speak? As educators? As parents? As citizens? Knowing perhaps too that, thanks to social media, our voices are louder, our platform is larger.

Recognizing even that the risks of speaking, for those of us with privilege, are smaller. Where has that gotten us so far? For we have been socialized to respect fear more than our own needs for language and definition, and while we wait in silence for that final luxury of fearlessness, the weight of that silence will choke us. The fact that we are here and that I speak not these words is an attempt to break that silence and bridge some of those differences between us, for it is not difference which immobilizes us, but silence.

And there are so many silences to be broken.

EX OBLIVIONE PDF

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While also describing how she looked in the black jeans he fondly remembered her always wearing, I let the brotha slide and assumed he was delirious from trauma this ex has dogged him in a way that I have never seen ANY woman do before…and he lets her. I will say here that this woman is an ethnic white woman i. Two weeks after this incident, I let the brotha know that his overly-sexualized language was not cool. I was the one he said was acting like a white man. It was as if the likes of me had committed some kind of serious affront by even mentioning this woman he was the one who always brought her up—she is simply NOT the kinda person I know. He even aggressively defended her Virtue, Truth, and Honesty by emphatically insisting that each time she initiated contact with him via social media and the like over the course of many, many years , she always backed off if he had a girlfriend.

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Impact of Audre Lorde: “The Transformation of Silence into Language and Action”

That the speaking profits me, beyond any other effect. I am standing here as a Black lesbian poet, and the meaning of all that waits upon the fact that I am still alive, and might not have been. Less than two months ago I was told by two doctors, one female and one male, that I would have to have breast surgery, and that there was a 60 to 80 percent chance that the tumor was malignant. Between that telling and the actual surgery, there was a three-week period of the agony of an involuntary reorganization of my entire life. The surgery was completed, and the growth was benign.

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The Transformation of Silence into Language and Action

But in the context of the entire essay — a beautiful essay on breast cancer, mortality, fear, race, visibility, and vulnerability — Lorde offers so much more than a highly quotable sentence on the responsibility or risk of silence or speech. An excerpt: "And, of course, I am afraid — you can hear it in my voice — because the transformation of silence into language and action is an act of self-revelation and that always seems fraught with danger. But most of all, I think, we fear the visibility without which we also cannot truly live. Within this country where racial difference creates a constant, if unspoken, distortion of vision, black women have on one hand always been highly visible, and so, on the other hand, have been rendered invisible through the depersonalization of racism. For to survive in the mouth of this dragon we call america, we have had to learn this first and most vital lesson — that we were never meant to survive.

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