A CHANCE ENCOUNTER MARY BALOGH PDF

A Chance Encounter Chapter 1 Mr. Frederick Soames, bailiff of Ferndale Manor, spent no more than an hour in the town of Granby one morning. Yet that short visit furnished the townspeople and the families of the surrounding countryside with enough food for gossip to keep them all happy for a week. Mainwaring was finally coming to take up residence in the manor that had been willed to him on the death of his uncle more than a year previously. The blacksmith told the innkeeper and the innkeeper told the butcher, who told everyone who came to his shop to purchase their meat supplies, that the master was coming for a lengthy stay, the Season in London being over for another year.

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A Chance Encounter Chapter 1 Mr. Frederick Soames, bailiff of Ferndale Manor, spent no more than an hour in the town of Granby one morning. Yet that short visit furnished the townspeople and the families of the surrounding countryside with enough food for gossip to keep them all happy for a week. Mainwaring was finally coming to take up residence in the manor that had been willed to him on the death of his uncle more than a year previously.

The blacksmith told the innkeeper and the innkeeper told the butcher, who told everyone who came to his shop to purchase their meat supplies, that the master was coming for a lengthy stay, the Season in London being over for another year. He was to be expected within the next week or ten days. The vicar told his wife, who told all her lady acquaintances, that the housekeeper at Ferndale had been given the most intriguing instructions.

She was to open up and prepare not only the master bedroom, but several guest chambers as well. It appeared that Mr. Mainwaring was not coming alone. During the week of excited anticipation, Ferdie Worthing, only son of the squire, Sir Harold Worthing, basked in sudden and unexpected fame. Ferdie was young and good-natured, but not particularly handsome or intelligent or talented. On this occasion, though, he had a distinct advantage over all his social peers: he knew Mr.

Of course, Ferdie did not really know the man. He had seen him twice from a distance the previous winter when a former university crony had invited him to London for a two-week visit. William Mainwaring had been pointed out to him one afternoon at a race meet, and Ferdie had taken a good look because he had recognized the name as that of the new owner of Ferndale.

He had also glimpsed the man at church one Sunday morning from a distance of eight or nine pews back. His acquaintance with his new neighbor was, therefore, very slight. But it was enough to catapult him into the limelight when no one else near Granby knew whether to expect an infant or an octogenarian, a gargoyle or an Adonis. Claridge and Miss Anne Claridge when his sister, Lucy, had persuaded him to escort her on a visit to the rectory one afternoon.

Looks as if he must have been poured into his coats. Claridge asked. Ferdie considered. Anne sighed. The following afternoon saw Mrs. Claridge and Anne at the home of Mr. Thomas Rowe, gentleman farmer, two miles outside town. Anne and Cecily Rowe were bosom friends and spent a great deal of time together exchanging confidences, Mrs. Claridge and Mrs. Rowe visited only when there was significant gossip to be exchanged. The occasion did not arise nearly as often as either of them oould have wished.

Mainwaring in residence at last," Mrs. Rowe told the room at large. Mainwaring is young and handsome and quite top-of-the-trees," Anne Claridge said to Cecily. It is amazing he did not claim to have been quite intimate with Mr. Worthing has merely provided information that we have all been longing to hear.

Mainwaring came to the manor," Mrs. Rowe said, nodding sagely. Rowe that we are so dull here in the country that we might as well not bother to dress and set an elegant table. When there is any entertainment, we see the same faces and the same gowns over and over again. Mainwaring brings a whole pile of young men with him. Mainwaring the moment he arrives," she said finally to Anne.

Mainwaring seems to be a single gentleman, but if he brings house guests and some of them are ladies, then perhaps we may call, Papa says. Papa wonders if Mr. Mainwaring will want new cushions for the seat. In fact, little else had been talked about for two days past.

Rowe already had Cecily all but betrothed to the unsuspecting Mr. They are too starchy and artificial for him, you may be bound. He will find a country girl refreshing. And Cecily is excessively pretty, you must admit. We do not know that he is an agreeable man or, indeed, for sure that he is not married.

Rowe said. We cannot have the London visitors thinking us country bumpkins. It is most provoking, indeed, that your papa will not take us to Bath to a more fashionable modiste, but he always says that forty miles is too great a distance to travel merely for trifles. Rowe will ever agree to a Season for you. We will have to make the best of our opportunities. Rowe, who had risen from her chair to pace excitedly about the room, suddenly stopped and turned to her employee.

It would also do you a great deal of good to meet Mr. Mainwaring and his friends. You are a gentlewoman, for all that you have been in our employ for six years. Now that Cecily is growing up, you should be thinking of returning to your own proper station. I am sure you could still make a quite respectable marriage if you applied yourself. And I have no wish to marry.

Come, Cecily, love, it is time to go to your room to get ready for dinner. You know your papa does not like it when you are I. Even before that, Elizabeth had frequently been asked to dine.

Rowe was very conscious of the fact that the governess had been born a lady and that only straitened circumstances had forced her to seek employment. She had tried for all of the six years to treat Elizabeth as a friend rather than as an employee.

The governess had gently but firmly resisted. She had been quite determined, in fact, to leave the house and seek a position elsewhere once Cecily no longer needed her, but Mrs. Rowe had pleaded so convincingly that her daughter needed a companion to restrain her wilder impulses that Elizabeth had agreed to stay for another few years.

Elizabeth Rossiter was six and twenty years old. She looked the part of a governess as she dressed for dinner without the help of a maid. The gray cotton dress, with its high, unadorned neckline and long, fitting sleeves, was changed for an evening dress that was almost identical except that the fabric was silk. She loosened her long chestnut hair, which was tied in a severe knot at the back of her neck, brushed it until it shone and crackled against the hard bristles of the brush, and arranged it in the same style.

The face that looked back at her from the mirror was calm. There was no self-pity in the look. Elizabeth had been considered an exceptionally beautiful girl when she made her come-out in London at the age of twenty. Not pretty, but beautiful. She had acquired a dignity in face of the difficulties of her situation. Her father had been frequently in his cups; he held gambling parties in his country home and was often beset by creditors.

Through it all, Elizabeth had tried to run the house as if it were a home for the sake of John, her younger brother. But when John, under the sponsorship of his godfather, had gone to Oxford, Elizabeth had finally given in to the frequent pleadings of Lady Crawford, her maternal aunt, and had gone to London to be introduced to the ton. Things might have gone well for her there.

She had made friends, she had had admirers, her engagement calendar had constantly been filled. Aunt Matilda had been hopeful of her making a good match despite her lack of fortune. Elizabeth often wondered what might have happened had she not met Robert, but, of course, such thoughts were useless conjecture.

She had met Robert and fallen in love with him and… But she had trained herself over the long years not to think of that episode in her life. The fact was that even before the end of the Season she had been back in the country with her father and that within a year he had been dead.

No one had been more surprised than she to discover that her father had left no debts. Even so, the estate was impoverished, and bringing it back to prosperity would be a long and tedious business tor her brother, who was still only eighteen years old. A jood bailiff had been hired to reverse the neglect of years, while John finished his studies at university. Elizabeth had reached the decision to seek employment and had found a position with the Rowes in the West Country. John had been upset and, in fact, had constantly tried to persuade her to resign her position and to move back home.

She would never marry- her experience in London had assured that. And she would not burden her brother with her presence. She had been glad of her decision when John married at the age of two and twenty and a child arrived the following year. She was delighted, too, to know that the estate, though still not prosperous, was beginning to pay its way. Elizabeth descended to the dining room when the bell sounded, and spent the next hour listening, in some amusement, to Mrs.

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A Chance Encounter Duo

Shelves: virginal-heroine , sexy-hot-hero , beautiful-heroine , fucked-up-relatives , hero-celibate-during-separation , heroine-celibate-during-separation , hero-was-a-stubborn-asshole , cunty-bitch-ow , hero-behaves-like-a-cunt , broody-hero-with-tortured-past This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Lots of repetitive eye rolling occurred during the reading of this novel. This second chance storyline was based on a trope that is one of my least favourites in romance: the grand misunderstanding trope. They fell in love and got married secretly, because the H Robert was the younger son of a marquess who expected him to marry an Lots of repetitive eye rolling occurred during the reading of this novel. They fell in love and got married secretly, because the H Robert was the younger son of a marquess who expected him to marry an heiress.

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A CHANCE ENCOUNTER

The former is contemporary romantic suspense, this one Traditional Regency. Where the former has numerous sex scenes, full of detail, A Chance Encounter is very subtle, with the suggestion of undoing buttons and bodies pressed together. Nothing explicit at all. At least until she crosses paths with Robert Denning, Marquess of Hetherington, a man she would rather not have to ever see again.

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